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  • The Gray Family Chippendale Carved Mahogany Slant Front Desk New York, c1790

The Gray Family Chippendale Carved Mahogany Slant Front Desk New York, c1790

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The Gray Family Chippendale Carved Mahogany Slant Front Desk New York, c1790

0.00
sold out

Important Chippendale desk coming directly from a local estate where it descended in the Andrew C. Gray family of New Castle / Wilmington, Delaware. Highly carved squatty ball and claw feet. Line of descent: Andrew Gray to Senator George Gray to Emily Gray Thouron to last owner.

Important 18th century example, New York, c1760-90, with highly carved ball and claw feet and figured mahogany case. Fitted interior contains a secret compartment beyond the prospet door.

The Gray family provenance is quite impressive when you think of the many important desisions that probably were written out on this desk over the years. Just take a look at the history of the Law Firm that he started and still exists today: http://www.potteranderson.com/about-lawyers.html

Condition: Unrestored, coming directly from the family, which is rare. Feet are currently in stable condition, but have been repaired over the years. Case is missing pieces, especially along edges of drawer fronts. Old varnish on slant front. Replaced brasses. One drawer on interior sticks. Some missing pieces to fitted interior. Lopers work, but have been repaired over the years. Missing one loper pull. Back of case shows warping. Breaks to the feet carving, but all appears to be present. Filled in holes on top surface where a "married" bookcase had been mounted. One piece on underside of back foot is replaced.

A Chest-on-chest with similar carved feet is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, descended in the Van Rensselaer family of New York.

Measurements: 44" H x 38' W x 20 1/2" D

Info from Mill Creek Hundred History Blog:
Andrew C. Gray was born in 1804 in Kent County, and came with his family to Mill Creek Hundred in 1808. He studied law, and 1826 began practicing in New Castle. He became one of the most prominent lawyers in the state, and the practice he started is still in business today. Gray retired from active practice in 1854 and turned his attention to business management, becoming the head of a number of large firms, including the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, the Farmer's Bank of Delaware, and several railroads. His son, George Gray, exceeded even these lofty heights. George Gray began as an attorney in his father's firm, but would go on to become Attorney General of Delaware, a three-time US Senator, and finally a Federal Judge.
http://mchhistory.blogspot.com/2010/11/judge-morris-estate-part-2.html

George Gray (May 4, 1840 - August 7, 1925) was an American lawyer, judge, and politician from New Castle, in New Castle County, Delaware. He was a member of the Democratic Party, who served as Attorney General of Delaware, U.S. Senator from Delaware and Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit. Gray was born in New Castle, Delaware. He attended the common schools and graduated from Princeton University in 1859. After studying law with his father, Andrew C. Gray, he attended Harvard Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1863. He was in private practice in New Castle until 1879. Professional and political career Gray served as Delaware Attorney General from 1879 until March 18, 1885. He resigned this position upon election as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of U.S. Senator Thomas F. Bayard, Sr. Gray was reelected in 1887 and 1893, and served in the Senate from March 18, 1885, until March 3, 1899. During his service as U.S. Senator, Gray was chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Patents and the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections in the 53rd Congress. In the 53rd Congress he was chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Revolutionary Claims. He was a member of the Joint High Commission which met in Quebec in August 1898 to settle differences between the United States and Canada. He also served as a member of the commission to arrange terms of peace between the United States and Spain in 1898 to end the Spanish–American War. After failing in his bid for reelection in 1899, President William McKinley made Gray a recess appointment to a new third seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, created by 30 Stat. 846. Appointed on March 29, 1899, he was later nominated, confirmed by the United States Senate, and commissioned on December 18, 1899. He served until his retirement on June 1, 1914. During this time he was chairman of the commission to investigate conditions of the coal strike in Pennsylvania in 1902, and was largely responsible for its settlement. He was also a member of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution from 1890 until 1925, and vice president and trustee of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Gray was proposed as a nominee for the Presidency at the 1904 and 1908 Democratic Conventions. In 1904, he received only 12 votes, but in 1908 he received 50.5 votes from the delegates, finishing second behind the party nominee, William Jennings Bryan.[1] President William McKinley also appointed him to the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague in 1900, and he was subsequently reappointed in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt, in 1912 by President William Taft, and in 1920 by President Woodrow Wilson. He was also a member of several commissions established to arbitrate various international disputes. Death and legacy Gray died at Wilmington and is buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery at New Castle, Delaware.

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Important Chippendale desk coming directly from a local estate where it descended in the Andrew C. Gray family of New Castle / Wilmington, Delaware. Highly carved squatty ball and claw feet. Line of descent: Andrew Gray to Senator George Gray to Emily Gray Thouron to last owner.

Important 18th century example, New York, c1760-90, with highly carved ball and claw feet and figured mahogany case. Fitted interior contains a secret compartment beyond the prospet door.

The Gray family provenance is quite impressive when you think of the many important desisions that probably were written out on this desk over the years. Just take a look at the history of the Law Firm that he started and still exists today: http://www.potteranderson.com/about-lawyers.html

Condition: Unrestored, coming directly from the family, which is rare. Feet are currently in stable condition, but have been repaired over the years. Case is missing pieces, especially along edges of drawer fronts. Old varnish on slant front. Replaced brasses. One drawer on interior sticks. Some missing pieces to fitted interior. Lopers work, but have been repaired over the years. Missing one loper pull. Back of case shows warping. Breaks to the feet carving, but all appears to be present. Filled in holes on top surface where a "married" bookcase had been mounted. One piece on underside of back foot is replaced.

A Chest-on-chest with similar carved feet is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, descended in the Van Rensselaer family of New York.

Measurements: 44" H x 38' W x 20 1/2" D

Info from Mill Creek Hundred History Blog:
Andrew C. Gray was born in 1804 in Kent County, and came with his family to Mill Creek Hundred in 1808. He studied law, and 1826 began practicing in New Castle. He became one of the most prominent lawyers in the state, and the practice he started is still in business today. Gray retired from active practice in 1854 and turned his attention to business management, becoming the head of a number of large firms, including the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, the Farmer's Bank of Delaware, and several railroads. His son, George Gray, exceeded even these lofty heights. George Gray began as an attorney in his father's firm, but would go on to become Attorney General of Delaware, a three-time US Senator, and finally a Federal Judge.
http://mchhistory.blogspot.com/2010/11/judge-morris-estate-part-2.html

George Gray (May 4, 1840 - August 7, 1925) was an American lawyer, judge, and politician from New Castle, in New Castle County, Delaware. He was a member of the Democratic Party, who served as Attorney General of Delaware, U.S. Senator from Delaware and Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit. Gray was born in New Castle, Delaware. He attended the common schools and graduated from Princeton University in 1859. After studying law with his father, Andrew C. Gray, he attended Harvard Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1863. He was in private practice in New Castle until 1879. Professional and political career Gray served as Delaware Attorney General from 1879 until March 18, 1885. He resigned this position upon election as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of U.S. Senator Thomas F. Bayard, Sr. Gray was reelected in 1887 and 1893, and served in the Senate from March 18, 1885, until March 3, 1899. During his service as U.S. Senator, Gray was chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Patents and the U.S. Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections in the 53rd Congress. In the 53rd Congress he was chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Revolutionary Claims. He was a member of the Joint High Commission which met in Quebec in August 1898 to settle differences between the United States and Canada. He also served as a member of the commission to arrange terms of peace between the United States and Spain in 1898 to end the Spanish–American War. After failing in his bid for reelection in 1899, President William McKinley made Gray a recess appointment to a new third seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, created by 30 Stat. 846. Appointed on March 29, 1899, he was later nominated, confirmed by the United States Senate, and commissioned on December 18, 1899. He served until his retirement on June 1, 1914. During this time he was chairman of the commission to investigate conditions of the coal strike in Pennsylvania in 1902, and was largely responsible for its settlement. He was also a member of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution from 1890 until 1925, and vice president and trustee of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Gray was proposed as a nominee for the Presidency at the 1904 and 1908 Democratic Conventions. In 1904, he received only 12 votes, but in 1908 he received 50.5 votes from the delegates, finishing second behind the party nominee, William Jennings Bryan.[1] President William McKinley also appointed him to the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague in 1900, and he was subsequently reappointed in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt, in 1912 by President William Taft, and in 1920 by President Woodrow Wilson. He was also a member of several commissions established to arbitrate various international disputes. Death and legacy Gray died at Wilmington and is buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery at New Castle, Delaware.

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